Myth 11: Rear tires should run at (significantly) higher pressure

Off The Beaten Path

To celebrate Bicycle Quarterly‘s 15th anniversary, we are looking at myths in cycling: things we used to believe, but which we’ve since found out not to be true. Today, we explain why your bike’s weight distribution does not directly translate into your tire pressures.

We are partly responsible for the myth that front tires should run at significantly lower pressures. When we first started researching tires, we published Frank Berto’s tire pressure chart, which lists inflation pressures to achieve a ‘tire drop’ of 15% with average tires. That pressure depends on the width of the tire and on the load on the wheel.

Most bikes carry roughly twice as much weight on the rear wheel as on the front (above). So we reasoned that it makes sense to inflate the rear tire twice as hard as the front one. Except it doesn’t work that way.

During hard braking, the…

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Can Proper Stimming Reduce the Risk of Dental Problems in Autistic People?

Teeth_Grinding

It’s possible to reduce harmful forms of stimming by focusing on healthy and safe forms. You can find more information in wikiHow. Would it also benefit autistic people who clench their teeth during the day?

Recently, during my dental check up, some signs of teeth clenching such as gum recession and worn surfaces were noted. I recalled daytime teeth clenching in the past few months. Years ago, I experienced daytime teeth clenching too.

My guess is that teeth clenching can be a form of stimming. It’s more subtle than rocking or hand flapping. You can clench your teeth while eating without people noticing it. In healthy chewing, our teeth rarely touch while chewing.

Since the pressure to stim can eventually get too high that we must stim in one way or another, how do autistic people camouflage so well that they’re diagnosed late or never? Is it possible that they stim in subtle ways or stim in ways that look socially acceptable instead?

Besides teeth clenching, other subtle forms of stimming that I do include squeezing my eyes shut, jerking my head, walking or running on the edge of my foot which may cause stress fractures over time, and flexing certain muscles sometimes to the point of soreness. You can look away while when your stims involve your facial muscles. When running or walking, if you squeeze your glutes while your legs move back, it’s hardly noticeable to other people once they reach their range of motion.

It’s hard for me to imagine avoiding both obvious and subtle forms of stimming for a few hours till I get home when there’s pressure to stim one way or another.

I thought I had Tourette Syndrome. Some people who pointed it out called it tics. If different forms of stimming are used, does that mean the person’s autism or need to stim was outgrown?

Since missing teeth and dental restorations are expensive, we should find a way to stop teeth clenching.

Can Chocolate Affect Sleep (Based on Sleep Data)

For the sleep data, chocolate was consumed around 3 pm the day before. The quantity was only two small chocolate pieces.

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Interestingly, only 18 minutes was spent in REM sleep.

More sleep data may be needed to draw a conclusion whether chocolate affects sleep quality. Other factors may have affected it which includes:

  • Magnesium supplementation which may improve deep sleep.
  • Milk chocolate which has less caffeine than dark chocolate, tea, or coffee?
  • Sleep start was about half an hour later than the previous night’s.
  • The last time chocolate was consumed was months ago which may affect tolerance to its caffeine. Mineral levels may also affect sleep.

First Indoor Cycling MAF Test

This was my first MAF test using the trainer was at its highest resistance.

The data was recorded on Strava.

Screenshot 2018-03-10 18.43.37

Lap 1

Screenshot 2018-03-10 18.43.43

  • Duration: 10:05
  • Distance: 3.56 km
  • Average speed: 21.2 km/h
  • Max speed: 22.2 kn/h
  • Average cadence: 77
  • Max cadence: 87
  • Average HR: 148
  • Max HR: 154
  • Estimated power: 156W

Lap 2

Screenshot 2018-03-10 18.43.46

  • Duration: 10:03
  • Distance: 3.57 km
  • Average speed: 21.3 km/h
  • Max speed: 22.5 km/h
  • Average cadence: 77
  • Max cadence: 81
  • Average HR: 147
  • Max HR: 153
  • Estimated power: 156W